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UALE Popular Education Working Group Meeting               11.27.17

1) Welcome, Introductions & Agenda Review

  • Keturah Raabe IBEW, Riahl O’Malley (UFE), Darby Frye (AFSCME WA), Zach Cunningham (CSEA), Susan Winning (UMass Lowell), Tess Ewing (retired UMASS Boston), Don Taylor (UW), Kate Shaughnessy (AFL-CIO), Eric Larson (UMASS Dartmouth)

2) Reminder to submit proposals by November 30th!

  • Working group proposals submitted to conference committee due on January 15th
  • Some workshop proposals we will say are on behalf of working group
  • We will also submit those individual proposals that we wish to include in a “popular education” track at the conference
  • Proposals discussed so far: from Don Taylor on Janus or Popular Education & labor history, from D’Arcy and Keturah using popular education on skill-based curricula, from Susan and Annetta on social justice unionism, from Riahl & UFE on “curriculum deck” resource, from Tess and Riahl on Popular Education what it is and how to address challenges in dedicating more time and resource to pop ed.

3) Sub-committee to review proposals [Darby]

  • Zach Cunningham, Kate Shaughnessy, Eric Larson, Darby & Riahl
  • Darby will send Doodle to schedule meeting

4) Report back sub-committee (see below) [Riahl]

  • Definition of Popular Education (Susan, Tess, Richard, Riahl)

      See draft below

      Subcommittee will take feedback, revise, and send back to the group with a deadline for final feedback

      Thanks to Tess for taking a lead on making this project happen

      Suggested changes/additions:

  • Overall positive feedback from the group
  • Suggestion to re-order bullets from experience toward practice and transformation
  • Egalitarian but specify the facilitator’s unique role and responsibility
  • Contrast to banking model/status quo?
  • Popular education strives to confront the power dynamics in the classroom, workplace, and beyond; anti-oppression
  • Address popular education specifically in the context of labor education- make a case for popular education in labor education

5) Next steps [Riahl]

  • Darby will help schedule sub-committee meetings
  • Riahl send notes on pop ed definition for feedback with deadline
  • Schedule next meeting right before 1/15

The sub-committee is working to define popular education as it pertains to our working group. Based on a variety of sources the sub-committee established a list of the following ideas. What would you add? We will compile the following and your feedback into a coherent paragraph to be reviewed once more and brought to the working group.

  • Aim is radical transformation/social and economic justice
    • It does not pretend to be neutral; it is openly on the side of the oppressed.
    • It holds that no education can be neutral: it must either take the side of those struggling for change, or it de facto takes the side of the status quo
    • It is focused on empowering a group that is engaged in progressive struggle, rather than promoting individual growth
    • It is based on the experience and issues of the learners
      • Its content is determined by that experience and those issues (generative themes)
      • Typically a particular session starts with the experience of the participants
      • It is egalitarian: everyone teaches, everyone learns. All adults bring experience from which others can learn
        • It is interactive
        • It engages mind, body and emotions
        • It is accessible to people of all educational levels
        • It promotes critical thinking and consciousness-raising. It links local issues to the global and the historical
        • It aims for reflective practice (praxis): learners strategize ways to improve their situation, try them out, evaluate, modify and try again